Tuesday, April 5, 2011

Aprons, Aprons, Aprons

Everywhere I look there are aprons.  Who knew that such a specific utility item could have so many interesting variations?  Here are a few apron scans I thought you would enjoy:

This is a McCall apron pattern from 1940.  Such a cute rick-rack planter pocket!  I have this pattern and hope to make it up sometime in the near future.

This is also a McCall pattern, this time from 1941.  I really like the way the apron folds up to look like a necktie.  I see this pattern all the time and EvaDress also has a reproduction of this pattern.

I've been seeing loads of really neat large flower petal design aprons from 1950's on ebay.  The one above is from the Pattern Peddler.  I would love to make one of these aprons one day!

This pattern is from 1947 and like the ones above has a neat design and features an applique as well as heart shapes in the pattern.  This is also from the pattern peddler but from their etsy shop.

I love 1940's aprons particularly.  For this week's challenge I'll be working with McCall 917 from 1941:
I'm going to forgo the embroidery (though I would love to make one up with embroidery at some point in the future).  Which leads me to a question for all of you.  How do you preserve iron-on embroidery sheets?  Can you use them more than once?  Do you transfer them to something else?  Thoughts on this would be great!

11 comments:

  1. I keep mine in a file with those transparent pockets you get in office supplies, because most of them are usable a few times. When you press them with the iron the longer the iron stays on the darker the transfer is, if you get the knack of not keeping it on too much the ink will last much longer for more applications. If the ink wears off too much to transfer you can just go over it again with an iron on transfer pen. Love the 1947 apron, such a cute shape!

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  2. The blog feeling stitchy has a lot of information on this...for example, using tracing pencils: http://unafloresita.blogspot.com/2006/09/how-to-use-transfer-pencil.html
    Plus, it is a fun blog to read!

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  3. These are so cute! I have quite a thing for aprons; I love making them to use (since I can create such a mess when cooking and baking! ;). I've made two in the past couple weeks and am eying another to make soon. ;)

    I'm kind of curious to hear about some advice for preserving those old iron-on transfers as well. I have a few of these and need to sit down and figure out whether I should just make a new tracing (and use a transfer pencil) or what...

    ♥ Casey

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  4. personally, i make a photocopy of the design and then use embroidery tracing paper to trace it onto my fabric. i've seen the transfer pencils, but i've personally never used them.

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  5. I used to use those iron-ons a lot, and noticed that you can indeed use them plenty of times, just do as Sarah said, and don't keep the iron on it for very long because you don't really need the pattern that dark on the fabric. But generally I think you can use them maaaany times. :) I too keep mine in plastic pockets and they seem to keep just fine. :)

    Piia

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  6. You can use iron on transfer lots of times, and then when they've run out just trace the pattern or draw over the pattern on the sheet with a transfer pen or pencil and keep using it that way. It's really a personal thing if you trace, use carbon transfer paper or use tracing pens or pencils. Check out this link for advice on different methods:
    http://www.sublimestitching.com/transfertechniques.html
    ooh also this one;
    http://wildolive.blogspot.com/2011/03/embroidery-basics-transferring-pattern.html

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  7. Wow, those are so cute. I fnially have to make myself an apron - I even bought gingham fabric for one more than a year ago! :)

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  8. I don't anything about the transfers, but I think the red polka dot fabric with your pattern will look very cute!

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  9. Love the aprons. I have a 1950s pattern that I've been meaning to make up. I haven't done embroidery for years, so I don't have advice on that - but definitely interested in what others have posted, since one of my 1940s slip patterns came with an embroidery transfer.

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  10. there is printer paper which when printed...become transfer sheets themselves...if you scanned the print then printed it out with those sheets...you could use them again...just print it out again.

    Nadine

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I read each and every comment--thank you so much!

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